Make India Asbestos Free

Make India Asbestos Free
For Asbestos Free India

Ban Asbestos Network of India (BANI) works for Asbestos Free India inspired by trade union leader Purnendu Majumadar. Occupational Health India and ToxicsWatch Alliance are its members that includes doctors, researchers and activists. BANI demands criminal liability for companies and medico-legal remedy for victims. It works with trade unions, human rights, environmental, consumer and public health groups. For Details:1715krishna@gmail.com, oshindia@yahoo.in

Friday, November 7, 2008

BANI outraged after Rotterdam Convention

Russia Cancer News - Media Monitoring Service by EIN News

Ban Asbestos Network of India (BANI) Outraged After Rotterdam Convention
6 Nov 2008

... Group calls the non-addition of chrysotile asbestos to UN list disgraceful, denounces several A ... of Indian citizens who call themselves BANI (Ban Asbestos Network of India) released a statement this week ...

Asbestos in hazardous list In India - no way!
5 Nov 2008 07
... few reckless governments that has created a stalemate for the UN hazardous chemicals treaty, Ban Asbestos Network of India (BANI) statement says, "Canadian, Russian and Indian governments have turned a blind eye.towards how the atmosphere around asbestos factory and asbestos products becomes poisonous and imperils the health and life of their citizens.”.

www.einnews.com/russia/newsfeed-russia-cancer

Ban Asbestos Network of India (BANI) has accused Canadian, Russian and Indian governments of turning a blind eye towards the towards how the atmosphere around asbestos factory and asbestos products becomes poisonous and imperils the health and life of their citizens.”

press.jrc.it/NewsBrief/alertedition/en/AgriculturalTechnology.html

BANI Group calls the non-addition of chrysotile asbestos to UN list “disgraceful,” denounces several countries and their governments

A group of Indian citizens who call themselves BANI (Ban Asbestos Network of India) released a statement this week stating their position on the asbestos-related decisions at the Rotterdam Convention. In their statement, BANI claimed that “Canadian, Russian and Indian governments have turned a blind eye towards how the atmosphere around asbestos factory and asbestos products becomes poisonous and imperils the health and life of their citizens.”

The BANI statement went on to say that “India’s position is disgraceful” and that Indian leaders are failing to protect their people, as well as the people of other impoverished nations, by “depriving them of information” related to asbestos safety and the health risks associated with exposure.

R. H. Khawaja, head of the Indian delegation at the Rotterdam Convention and representative of India’s Ministry of Environment, took an “untenable” position. BANI reacted to their government’s position by stating that Indian leaders have a “naked lust for profit at the cost of human health.”

Here in North America, the Canadian government has yet to react to the decisions made at the Convention. Canadian-mined chrysotile asbestos accounts for almost 95% of exported asbestos, and almost half of Canada’s exported ore ends up in India, where the rates of mesothelioma cancer continue to increase in asbestos handlers and workers.

In America, asbestos is not banned. Usage regulations state that materials containing asbestos cannot exceed 1% asbestos, but exposure to this toxin continues to be an issue. Countless Americans who work in a number of different industries, including construction, are exposed to airborne asbestos each year, and due to the latency period of between 20 and 30 years associated with mesothelioma, these individuals may not begin to experience any symptoms until they are well into their sixties. Many Americans continue to push for a total ban on asbestos, but the American government has yet to pass any related legislation.

For now, the rate of death from asbestos cancer will continue to increase worldwide, especially in impoverished nations where the health and safety of workers is not always a priority.

Related article courtesy of merinews.com.

Source: pr-canada.net

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